10 Monk fruit Benefits and Side Effects

Introduction

Here are the Monk fruit Benefits and Side Effects that you would be amaze to know. For hundreds of years, monk fruit has been grown in southern China. It’s a small, melon-like fruit named after the Buddhist monks who cultivated it centuries ago.
Swingle fruit is another name for monk fruit. It belongs to the same food group as gourds such as pumpkin and melon. In eastern countries, it has been used to treat intestinal problems and the common cold. Its application as a sweetener is relatively new.

This fruit has a naturally high sugar content. It has nearly 200 times the sweetness of sugar. The antioxidants in the fruit provide the sweetness.

Scientific name: Siraitia grosvenorii
Higher classification: Siraitia
Rank: Species
Family: Cucurbitaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Cucurbitales

Monk fruit Benefits

Monk fruit benefits

It burns calories

Because monk fruit sugar is metabolised differently than regular sugar, it can help you reduce your caloric intake.

Controls blood sugar

It has no effect on blood sugar. Monk fruit sugar has no effect on blood sugar levels and can help with glycemic control.

Has anti-inflammatory properties & aids Cancer

Mongrosides, the sweetener in monk fruit sugar, has anti-inflammatory properties. It has the potential to aid in the fight against cancer. Mongrosides can aid your body’s fight against cancer.

Prevents Tooth decay

It does not cause tooth decay. You don’t have to worry about monk fruit sugar causing cavities because it contains no actual sugar. You only require a small amount. Because it is 150-200 times sweeter than sugar, you only need a pinch to get the desired flavour, so it lasts longer than sugar.

Side Effects of Monk fruit

Monk fruit allergies are rare, but there’s a risk of allergic reaction with anything you consume. Monk fruit is a member of the Curcurbitaceae family (also known as the gourd family), which includes pumpkin, squash, cucumbers, and melons. Your risk of monk fruit allergy is higher if you’re allergic to other gourds. Signs of allergic reaction may include:

hives or rash
difficulty breathing
rapid or weak pulse
dizziness
swollen tongue
stomach pain or vomiting
wheezing

FAQ’s

What are Monk fruit sweeteners ?

Monk fruit is a small round fruit native to southern China that is also known as lo han guo or Swingle fruit. Monk fruit sweeteners are no-calorie sweeteners that can be used to reduce added sugar intake while still satisfying the desire for something sweet.

Some sweeteners in this category are low-calorie, such as aspartame, while others are zero-calorie (e.g., monk fruit sweeteners, stevia sweeteners and sucralose). However, they are frequently referred to collectively as sugar substitutes, high-intensity sweeteners, nonnutritive sweeteners, low- and no-calorie sweeteners, or simply low-calorie sweeteners.

Monk fruit sweeteners, like other no-calorie sweeteners, are extremely sweet. Monk fruit sweeteners are 150-200 times sweeter than sugar, so only a small amount is required in a product to match the sweetness provided by sugar. Monk fruit sweeteners are suitable for use in a variety of beverages and foods, including soft drinks, juices, dairy products, desserts, candies, and condiments.

Monk fruit sweeteners can be used in baked goods because they are stable at high temperatures. A recipe that uses monk fruit sweeteners instead of sugar, on the other hand, may turn out slightly different because, in addition to sweetness, sugar plays several roles in recipes related to volume and texture, but this varies depending on the type of recipe.

HOW ARE MONK FRUIT SWEETENERS PRODUCED?

Monk fruit sweeteners, like other no-calorie sweeteners, are extremely sweet. Monk fruit sweeteners are 150-200 times sweeter than sugar, so only a small amount is required in a product to match the sweetness provided by sugar. Monk fruit sweeteners are suitable for use in a variety of beverages and foods, including soft drinks, juices, dairy products, desserts, candies, and condiments.

Monk fruit sweeteners can be used in baked goods because they are stable at high temperatures. A recipe that uses monk fruit sweeteners instead of sugar, on the other hand, may turn out slightly different because, in addition to sweetness, sugar plays several roles in recipes related to volume and texture, but this varies depending on the type of recipe.

CAN MONK FRUIT SWEETENERS HELP WITH WEIGHT LOSS OR WEIGHT MAINTAINANCE?

It has also been suggested that people who are already overweight or obese may start choosing low-calorie-sweetened foods and beverages as a way to lose weight. 42-45 Because reverse causality may be a factor, it is difficult to conclude that the use of a low-calorie sweetener is the cause of weight gain. A World Health Organization-funded systematic review and meta-analysis published in 2019 advised that results from observational studies on low-calorie sweeteners and health outcomes be interpreted with caution, with a focus on plausible confounding and reverse causality.

It is important to note that losing and maintaining body weight necessitates the use of multiple approaches at the same time. Simply substituting low-calorie sweeteners for full-calorie, sugar-containing products is just one component.

CAN CHILDREN CONSUME MONK FRUIT SWEETENERS?

YES. While no research on monk fruit sweetener consumption in children has been published, no negative effects on health have been demonstrated in animal models or adults. 10 Monk fruit sweeteners can add sweetness to a child’s foods and beverages without increasing the number of calories or added sugars consumed. Monk fruit sweeteners, unlike sugars, are not fermentable, and erythritol is noncariogenic17, which means it does not promote tooth decay.

With a recent emphasis on reducing added sugar consumption, the number of food and beverage products containing low-calorie sweeteners has increased. Observational research among children and adults in the United States has revealed an increase in the percentage of people reporting daily consumption of products containing low-calorie sweeteners;18 however, current intake of each low-calorie sweetener is considered to be insufficient.

CAN PEOPLE WITH DIABETES CONSUME MONK FRUIT SWEETENERS? / Is monk fruit good for diabetics ?

YES. Foods and beverages made with low- and no-calorie sweeteners, such as monk fruit sweeteners, are frequently recommended to diabetics as an alternative to sugar-sweetened foods and beverages; they are also recommended to help these individuals satisfy their sweet tooth while controlling carbohydrate intake.

Consumption of monk fruit sweetener has not been studied in people with Type 2 diabetes. Some observational studies have found a link between low-calorie sweetener consumption and the risk of Type 2 diabetes; however, because none of the studies included monk fruit sweeteners, no evidence of a link between monk fruit sweetener consumption and Type 2 diabetes has been described in the published literature.

Monk fruit sweetener vs sugar

Alternative sweeteners are becoming more popular as people avoid sugar.
Monk fruit sweetener, also known as monk fruit extract, is a popular sweetener.
Monk fruit sweetener has been around for decades, but its popularity has recently increased as it has become more widely available.
It is completely natural, has no calories, and is 100-250 times sweeter than sugar. It may also possess antioxidant properties.
This article contains all of the information you need to know about monk fruit sweetener. Monk fruit sweetener is a zero-calorie natural sweetener. It contains mogrosides, which are unique antioxidants that make it 100-250 times sweeter than regular sugar.

The monk fruit is also known as luo han guo, which translates as “Buddha fruit.” Southeast Asia grows this small, round fruit.
The sweetener is made by removing the fruit’s seeds and skin and crushing it to extract the juice, which is then dried into a concentrated powder.
Monk fruit contains naturally occurring sugars, primarily fructose and glucose.
Unlike most fruits, however, the natural sugars in monk fruit are not responsible for its sweetness.
Mogrosides are separated from fresh-pressed juice during processing. As a result, monk fruit sweetener contains no fructose or glucose.

Monk fruit extract is now used as a standalone sweetener, a food and beverage ingredient, a flavour enhancer, and a component of sweetener blends.


Monk fruit vs Stevia

Stevia is a sweetener derived from the leaves of the Stevia rebaudiana plant, which is native to South America.
Steviol glycosides are substances found in the leaves that are 200-400 times sweeter than table sugar.
For centuries, people have used whole leaves or crude extracts of the plant as a sweetener. Despite this, due to safety concerns, the FDATrusted Source has not approved the use of raw stevia.
However, the FDA considers high-purity steviol glycoside extracts to be generally safe.
This means that stevia sweeteners in the United States are typically made up of highly purified extracts of the steviol glycosides rebaudioside A or stevioside. They may contain a combination of the two.

You may also go through the post for Sugarcane benefits & side effects which is also a natural form of sugar that one could consume in their daily need.

References

  1. Zhou G, Zhang Y, Li Y, Wang M, Li X. The metabolism of a natural product mogroside V, in healthy and type 2 diabetic rats. J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2018 Mar 15;1079:25-33
  2. Hiele M, Ghoos Y, Rutgeerts P, Vantrappen G. Metabolism of erythritol in humans: comparison with glucose and lactitol. Br J Nutr. 1993 Jan;69(1):169-76.
  3. Wölnerhanssen BK, Meyer-Gerspach AC, Beglinger C, Islam MS. Metabolic effects of the natural sweeteners xylitol and erythritol: A comprehensive review. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2020;60(12):1986-1998.
  4. U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. GRAS Notices: Siraitia grosvenorii [Internet]. Silver Spring, MD: U.S. Food and Drug Administration; 2010 January 15 [cited 2021

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